Andrii Dostliev

Martha Molfar, Andrii Dostliev

Ukrainians XYZ: habits, tastes, daily life

Master knyg, 2021

An album presenting 30 years of Ukrainian independence in vernacular photographs and in works by notable Ukrainian photographers.

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Andrii Dostliev

Soviet Ukrainian photography of the 1930s

self-published, 2020

This project aims to assemble an archive of Ukrainian vernacular photographs that were caught in the sight of Soviet imperial optics and either destroyed (often, along with their owners) or taken out of their original context and attached to criminal cases. All these descriptions and occasional images originate from archival cases of people repressed in the 1930s in Soviet Ukraine. They belong to the part of Ukrainian culture that was destroyed by the Soviet colonial regime leaving only void behind. These are mere traces of what was once somebody’s family photos and, at the same time, traces of the colonial gaze itself which was the last to look at these photos and had imprinted in them.

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Lia Dostlieva, Andrii Dostliev

An unduly restrictive view of salvation (Vinnytsia Limbo)

self-published, 2020

In the 2000s, Vinnytsia, a relatively small city in Ukraine, temporarily became an important hub of clandestine migration from Somalia to the EU. The route started in Somalia, led through the Gulf countries, then Moscow, through the Russian-Ukrainian border and after a stop in Vinnytsia (where the headquarters of the facilitators of the illegal border crossings were situated) through Transcarpatia, Slovakia or Hungary, Austria, and ended usually in Munich or Frankfurt.

For this project, we attempt to reconstruct the mythological space of cheap apartments for rent, where Somali migrants could have stayed in Vinnytsia, as well as optics through which they could have perceived the city.

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Andrii Dostliev, Lia Dostlieva

with introduction by Serhiy Zhadan

"I still feel sorry when I throw away food — Grandma used to tell me stories about the Holodomor"

Rodovid, 2019

Every time I throw away (for any of the reasons) potentially good food I subconsciously feel sorry for doing so. There are no logical reasons behind this sense of guilt — by all means, I can afford not to eat the food I don’t want to eat. These are only leftovers on the plate — and yet I feel so sorry.

This sense originates not in reason but rather in my postmemory. When I was a kid, my grandma would share with me memories from her childhood and sometimes among them were memories from the early 1930s — the times of the man-made famine of 1932-33 in Soviet Ukraine (called the “Holodomor“ — derived from “to kill by starvation” in Ukrainian), which killed, by various estimates, between 2.4 and 7.5 million people. And the guilt I feel now for the thrown-away food takes its origins there, in these stories about my family surviving this hunger.

To illustrate and to better understand this sense of guilt, I started recording the traces of all the food I’ve been throwing away with this sense.

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publisher's website

Andrii Dostliev

with essays by Oksana Dovgopolova and Lia Dostlieva

Occupation

Turbinicarpus books, 2017

In spring 2014 the Russian military, assisted by local collaborationists occupied part of Eastern Ukraine, including the largest city of the region — Donetsk. Occupied territory immediately became a dangerous place for any pro-Ukrainian individual.

I was last in Donetsk, my hometown, in January 2014. I could never have expected then that this visit would be my last one.

My family photo archive is still there in my flat. I may never see it again. It may no longer exist as I write this text or when you will be reading it. Attempts to retrieve it may entail unnecessary risks for those who would assist me. All I can do to preserve my family's visual history is to reconstruct at least those photos that I still remember. To reconstruct them using any available materials and photos of other people no longer needed by their previous owners. To occupy somebody else's memorabilia exactly the same way my own were occupied.

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Andrii Dostliev

Ulyssonki / У лисоньки

Turbinicarpus books, 2017

An epic fairy tale about Kolobok's escape from the Fox and his journey home.

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Andrii Dostliev

2. Weltkrieg in Blumen (Natürlich ohne die Blumen im Bild)

Turbinicarpus books, 2017

I've stumbled upon these images on German eBay. This eBay user offers for sale reproductions of vintage photos from "a personal photo archive". To prevent others from using the pictures posted online the seller digitally enhanced every image with pink flowers covering essential parts of the picture and placing them in such way that cropping them out would prove impossible.

Most of the images on sale by this user date back to the World War II. Black and white photos show German soldiers on the front line and Polish Jews being convoyed or searched, military parades, destroyed tanks and soldier graves, and every single one has the same large pink hauntingly beautiful flowers in it.

So what are these images now? Are they still historical documents? Can we accept that images of the war and of the Shoah are decorated with flowers - even if not for aesthetic reasons but purely commercial? And does commercial provenance of these flowers make them more acceptable?

Or are they samples of goods for sale now, both parts of the combined image serving as one, giving just enough information to evaluate the overall quality of the image and of the print?

And can we avoid noticing the abstract beauty of these collages - understanding what is depicted in these pictures and knowing that they were most likely never intended to be looked at with artistic interest?

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Andrii Dostliev

The story of Henry Morton Stanley

Turbinicarpus books, 2016

The story of Henry Morton Stanley, who failed to find Dr. Livingstone and died from fever somewhere in Central Africa.

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Andrii Dostliev

Catalogue of ships

artist book, mixed media, 2015

Artist book after Homer's Iliad.

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